Book Review: Doxology and Theology


doxology & theology Theology and Doxology are deeply intertwined.  Theology isn't exclusive to the business of pastors and doxology isn't exclusive to the musicians and rock stars.  While there is a tendency in the church to see these on opposite ends of the spectrum, this couldn't be further from the truth.  Matt Boswell, in Doxology and Theology writes, "Worship leaders ought to come to lead the people of God with a guitar in one hand, a Bible in the other, and know how to use each weapon well."  Doxology & Theology is not just a book for worship leaders, but a book for anyone who is doing pastoral ministry.  Matt Boswell and a host of other brilliant theologians and worship pastors have gotten together to be a resource for worship leaders calling us to take this task seriously.

This book is clearly written to music people, but I think that despite it's clear tone and audience of "worship leaders" it is a book that is valuable for all roles.  You are a worship leader, whether you have a guitar in your hand or bucket full of candy.  If you serve people - whether that be through music, children's ministry, student ministry, or preaching - understanding your role and specifically the connection between doxology  and theology is important to the life of the church.

I love the call throughout the book to have worship leaders who have a deep love for their Savior and also be pastoral in how they lead people.  The book even covers a range of topics from the more philosophical like "Doxology, Theology, and the Mission of God" to the highly practical (yet equally theological) "The Worship Leader and Creativity" or "The Worship Leader and His Pastor."

I'm not a musician and don't lead the congregation through music, yet I was inspired to take seriously my calling to lead worship with our students, in my home, and when I'm given the opportunities in front of our church.  I have not read a better book when it comes to the theology of worship ministry, and I hope this book shapes the way that worship leaders, pastors, and church-workers think about worship.

To give you a taste without spoiling the whole thing for you, here are a few quotes:

"We should never boldly proclaim into a microphone that which we wouldn't have the courage to share with our neighbor." - Matt Boswell

"Gifting may gain a man a platform, but character is what gives him a voice." - Matt Boswell

"The church cannot afford to settle for worship leaders who are capable musicians but are incompetent theologians." - Michael Bleecker

"Christians and churches that are intensely doxological will be intensely missional, and those who fail to worship will fail to spread worship." - Matt Papa

"They  [worship leaders] are public figures who symbolize private holiness and, therefore, are either drawn to their knees in regular, humble prayer, or are forced to become expert thespians, maintaining a consistent facade of righteousness." - Stephen Miller

"If nobody's following us Monday through Saturday, we're not leading worship; we're just leading songs." - Aaron Keyes

Buy this book.  If you're not directly involved in worship ministry, it's worth your time.  If you are, you must read it immediately.

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